Wir Ain Leed - North East Central Scots 
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Consonants

Consonants usually have the same phonetic values (pronunciation) in Scots, as in Standard English. For more detail see Orthography.

The grapheme <l> may be pronounced /j/ in words such as blue [bjuː], laik [jek] and plou [pjuː].

In Perthshire <tw> may be realised /kw/ in words like atween, twa, twal, twinty and twist.

Medial and final <ch> is usually /x/ in words such as bocht, loch and nicht.

Initial <ch> is usually /ʧ/ in words such as chap, chield, chirl and chowk.

The cluster <nch> is usually /nʃ/ is words such as brainch, clinch, dunch, hainch, inch and French.

The cluster <tch> is usually /ʧ/ in words such as fleetch and wratch.

The trigraph <dge> is usually /ʤ/ in words such as begrudge, cadge, cruldge and fadge.

The grapheme <g> is occasionally /ʤ/ in words such as breinge and gigot.

Final and medial <ld> between vowels is usually simplified to /l/, otherwise /ld/, in words such as auld, bield, cauld, elder and fauld.

Final and medial <nd> between vowels is usually simplified to /n/, otherwise /nd/, in words such as daunder, find, haund, saund and sindry.

The digraph <ng> is usually /ŋ/ in words such as finger, hing, ingan and single.

The digraph <nk> is usually /ŋk/ bink and hank

The digraph <qu> is usually initial /kw/ in words such as acquent, quair and queen.

The digraph <sh> is usually /ʃ/ in words such as creash and sheep. It may occasionally be /ʒ/ in words such as fushion and pushion.

The digraph <th> is usually /θ/ in words such as graith, thole and thrawn, /ð/ in words such as blether, thaim and thair.

The digraph <wh> is usually /ʍ/ in words such as wha, whan, wheech and wheel.

Vowels and Diphthongs

Vowels in unstressed positions are usually /ə/ in words such as aboot, the, oxter, duntit, bannock and smeddum.

Initial <a>

The digraph <ee> is usually /i/ in words such as dee, dree, eetem, freet, jeely, keep, meet, teeth, weel and weet.

The digraph <ei> is usually /e/ in words such as beir, deid, eild, heid, meidae, peir, spreid, teir and threid. However, <ei> before /x/ is usually /i/ in words such as dreich, heich and skeich.

Medial <ie> is usually /i/ in words such as bield, chield, scrieve and shielin.

The grapheme <e> is usually /ɛ/ in words such as bed, ebb, esh, gled, gless, fecht, seck and wecht.

Whinnyknowe, GlenrothesGlenrothes, Fife

The grapheme <i> is usually /ɪ/, towards the Highland line and before /l/, /kl/and /tl/, /ʌ/ may occur, in words such as drink, in, inch, licht, lift, pit, rin, simmer, sin and stibble. An <i> after <w> and <wh> is often /ʌ/ in words such as wid, whin, whisper, whit, wind, wir, wird, wirm and wittins.

The graphemes <o> and <oa> are usually /o/ in words such as boat, boss, box, coal, cod, common, dochter, hoast, on, rock and thocht.

Langtoun, ThorntonThornton, Fife

The digraph <oo> is usually /u/ in words such as aboot, coont, droop, hoose, moose, oot, scoor and soond.

The digraph <ou> is usually /u/ in words like allou, bouk, broun, cour, coum, doun, dout, poupit and thoum.

The cluster <u-e> is usually /u/ in words such as dule and hure.

The grapheme <u> is usually /ʌ/ in words such as bund, burn, drunken, fund, grund, truff, unce and wund.

The digraph <ui>, in initial short environments, is usually /jɪ/ in words such as uiss and medially it is /ɪ/ in words such as abuin, bluid, bruit, cuil, cuit, duin, fruit, guid, luif, luim, muin, schuil, spuin and Yuil.
In initial short long positions, <ui>, is usually /jeː/ in words such as uise (and abuise), and medially it is usually /eː/ in words such as buird, fluir, fuird, muir, muisic, ruise and shuir. However, in western parts of Fife older speakers still may have /ø/ and towards Perthshire it may be /y/

The Neuk, KinfaunsKinfauns, Perth and Kinross

The digraph <eu> is usually /(j)ʌ/ in words such as beuch, beuk, eneuch, heuk, leuch, leuk, neuk, sheuch, teuch and teug.

The digraph <ew> is usually /ju/ in dew, few, new and spew.

Dykeside, FreuchieFreuchie, Fife

The clusters <i-e> and <y-e> are usually /əi/, however, in long positions /aɪ/ may occur, in words such as advice, bide, byle, fine, fire, ile, rive, tyne, wice and wyte.

The digraphs <ey> and <ye> are usually /əi/, however, in long positions /aɪ/ may occur, in words such as cry, eyntment, eyster, fley and kye.

The dipraphs <oi> and <oy> are usually /oi/ in words such as Boid,foy, noise and ploy.

Initial and medial <ow> is usually /ʌu/ in words such as bowt, cowp, cowt, gowd, gowf, lowp and owsen. Root final that is <owe> in words such as flowe, glowe, growe, howe, knowe, lowe, rowe and towe.

Suffixes

Strictly speaking not a suffix, <ae> is usually /e/, to the west /i/ also occurs, in words such as Americae, arrae, barrae, nairae, swallae and windae.

Diminutive <ie> is usually /e/, in East Perthshire, if the preceding vowel is /i/ or /əi/, or the preceding consonant is /b, d, ð, g, v, ʒ/ or /z/, it is /i/, otherwise /ɪ/, in words such as laddie, lassie, grannie,shappie and wifie.

Adjectival <fu> is usually /fe/ in words such as awfu, carefu and mensefu.

The negative particle <na> is usually /ne/ in words such as daena (dinna), haesna, maunna, winna and wisna.

Adverbial and adjectival <y> and <ie> are usually /e/, in East Perthshire, if the preceding vowel is /i/ or /əi/, or the preceding consonant is /b, d, ð, g, v, ʒ/ or /z/, it is /i/, otherwise /ɪ/, in words such as reekie, sairy, stany and stourie.

Adverbial <ly> is usually /le/, in East Perthshire, if the preceding vowel is /i/ or /əi/, or the preceding consonant is /b, d, ð, g, v, ʒ/ or /z/, it is /li/, otherwise /lɪ/, in words such as brawly, feckly, fully, geyly, likely and uncoly.

Literature:

Wilson, James (1916) Lowland Scotch as Spoken in the Lower Strathearn District of Perthshire, Oxford University Press.
Wilson, James (1926) The Dialects of Central Scotland, London: Oxford University Press.
Mather, James Y. and H. H. Speitel (1986) The Linguistic Atlas of Scotland volume 3, London: Croom Helm.
Johnston, Paul (1997) "Regional variation" in Charles Jones ed. The Edinburgh History of the Scots Language, Edinburgh University Press, 443-513.