Listen In - Rashie Coat 
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Rashie Coat

This recording is of the Scottish fairy tale Rashie Coat.
The Scots transcription uses the traditional literary conventions described in Wir Ain Leed, it is a transcription of what was said, not an attempt at phonetic accuracy.

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Rashy Coat wis a king's dochter, an her faither wantit her tae be mairied; but she didna like the man. Her faither said she haed tae tak him; an she didna ken whit tae dae. Sae she gaed awa tae the hen-wife tae speir whit she shoud dae. An the hen-wife said: "Say ye winna tak him unless thay gie ye a coat o the beaten gowd." Weel, thay gae her a coat o the beaten gowd; but she didna want tae tak him for aw that. Sae she gaed tae the hen-wife again, an the hen-wife said: "Say ye winna tak him unless thay gie ye a coat made o the feathers o aw the birds o the air." Sae the king sent a man wi a great heap o corn; an the man cried tae aw the birds o the air: "Ilka bird tak up a pea an pit doun a feather; ilka bird tak up a pea an pit doun a feather." Sae ilka bird teuk up a pea an pit doun a feather an thay teuk aw the feathers an made a coat o thaim, an gae it tae Rashy Coat; but she didna want tae tak him for aw that. Weel, she gaed tae the hen-wife again, an speired whit she shoud dae; an the hen-wife said: "Say ye winna tak him unless thay gie ye a coat o rashes an a pair o slippers." Weel, thay gae her a coat o rashes an a pair o slippers; but she didna want tae tak him for aw that. Sae she gaed tae the hen-wife again, an the hen-wife said she coudna help her ony mair.

Weel, she left her faither's hoose, an gaed faur, an faur, an faurer nor A can tell; an she cam tae a king's hoose, an she gaed in til't. An thay speired at her whit she wis seekin, an she said she wis seekin service; an thay gae her service an set her intae the kitchen tae wash the dishes, an tak oot the ess, an aw that. An whan the Sawbath-day cam, thay aw gaed tae the kirk, an left her at hame tae keuk the denner. An thare wis a fairy cam tae her, an telt her tae pit on her coat o the beaten gowd, an gang tae the kirk. An she said she coudna gang, for she haed tae keuk the denner; an the fairy telt her tae gang, an she wad keuk the denner for her. An she said

"Ae peat gar anither peat burn,
Ae spit gar anither spit turn,
Ae pat gar anither pat play,
Let Rashy Coat gang tae the kirk the day."

Sae Rashy Coat pit on her coat o the beaten gowd, an gaed awa tae the kirk. An the king's son fell in luve wi her; but she cam hame afore the kirk skailed, an he coudna find oot wha she wis. An whan she cam hame she fand the denner keukit, an naebody kent she'd been oot. Weel, the neist Sawbath-day, the fairy cam again, an telt her tae pit on the coat o feathers o aw the birds o the air, an gang tae the kirk, an she wad keuk the denner for her. Weel, she pit on the coat o feathers, an gaed tae the kirk. An she cam oot afore it skailed; an whan the king's son saw her gaun oot, he gaed awa tae; but he coudna find oot wha she wis. An she got hame, an teuk aff the coat o feathers, an fand the denner keukit, an naebody kent she haed been oot.

An the neist Sawbath-day, the fairy cam til her again, an telt her tae pit on the coat o rashes an the pair o slippers, an gang tae the kirk again. Ah weel, she did it aw; an this time the king's son sat near the door, an whan he saw Rashy Coat slippin oot afore the kirk skailed, he slippit oot tae an grippit her. An she got awa frae him, an ran hame; but she lost ane o her slippers, an he teuk it up. An he garred cry throu aw the kintra, that onybody that coud get the slipper on, he wad mairy thaim. Sae aw the leddies o the coort tried tae get the slipper on, an it wadna fit nane o thaim. An the auld hen-wife cam an fuish her dochter tae try an get it on, an she nippit her fit, an clippit her fit, an got it on that wey. Sae the king's son wis gaun tae mairy her. An he wis takkin her awa tae mairy her, an ridin on a horse, an her ahint him; an thay cam tae a wid, an thare wis a bird sittin on a tree, an as thay gaed by, the bird said:

"Nippit fit an clippit fit
Ahint the king's son rides
But bonny fit an pretty fit
Ahint the caudron hides."

An whan the king's son heard this, he flang aff the hen-wife's dochter, an cam hame again, an leukit ahint the caudron, an thare he fand Rashy Coat greetin for her slipper. An he tried her fit wi the slipper, an it gaed on fine. Sae he mairied her.

AN THAY LEEVED HAPPY AN HAPPY,
AN NIVER DRANK OOT O A DRY CAUPIE.