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The Twa Tams, PerthPerth, Perth and Kinross

The cardinal and ordinal adjectives are:

Cardinal
Ordinal
ae / ane
one
first
first
twa
two
seicont
second
three
three
thrid
third
fower
four
fowert
fourth
five
five
fift
fifth
sax
six
saxt
sixth
seiven
seven
seivent
seventh
aicht
eight
aicht
eighth
nine
nine
nint
ninth
ten
ten
tent
tenth
eleiven
eleven
eleivent
eleventh
twal
twelve
twalt
twelfth
thirteen, thriteen
thirteen
thirteen, thriteent
thirteenth
fowerteen
fourteen
fowerteent
fowerteenth
fifteen
fifteen
fifteent
fifteenth
...
 
...
 
twinty
twenty
twintiet
twentieth
twinty-ane*
twenty-one
twinty-first
twenty-first
twinty-twa
twenty-two
twinty-seicont
twenty-
second
...
 
...
 
thirty, thretty
thirteen
thirtiet, threttiet
thirtieth
fowerty
forty
fowertiet
fourtieth
...
 
...
 
hunder
hundred
hundert
hundredth
thoosand
thousand
thoosandt
thousandth
million
million
milliont
millionth
* Usage used to be ane an twinty, twa an twinty etc.
The Fermer's Fower, Loch LevenLoch Leven, Fife

Occasionaly the cardinal is used for the ordinal.

The seiventeen September.
The seventeenth of September.
We will read the aichteen chaipter, fowerteen an fifteen verses.
We shall read the eighteenth chapter, fourteenth and fifteenth verses.

Ane [en], also [wan], is usually realised [jɪn] in Southern and many Central Scots dialects and [in] in in Mid Northern dialects.

Ae, [e:] or [je:], also means the only or single 'one' and is used before nouns. In Western and Ulster dialects ae may be replaced by ane, perhaps due to influence from Irish. However, in other varieties ae and ane are not interchangeable.

The ae body that cam til the pairty.
The only person who came to the party.
Ae day we'll hae a vacance.
One day we'll have a holiday.
A wis juist wantin the ae nummer for tae win the bingo.
I only needed one number in order to win the bingo.

The abbreviated forms of the ordinal adjectives are:

1st, 2nt, 3rd or 3d, 4t. etc.
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th etc.

Numerals can be used in the plural to signify groups.

anes
ones
twas
twos
threes
threes
fowers
fours
fives
fives
saxes
sixes
seivens
sevens
aichts
eights...

The adverbial numbers are ance ([ens], [jɪns]), twice, thrice then fower times, etc. Further to those literary forms are also the dialect forms 'yinst' [jɪnst] in Southern, South-east, West Central and Ulster dialects, 'wanst' [wanst] in and around Glasgow, and 'twicet' [twəist] in West Central dialects.

Multiples are:

single
single
dooble
double
treeple
treble, triple
three-ply etc.
triple, threefold etc.

Groups of people arranged by number in games or activities are denoted by suffixing some.

twasome,
threesome,
fowersome,
aichtsome.

A twasome at the glessy bouls.
Two people playing marbles.
A threesome at the gowf.
Three people playing golf.
Will we dance the aichtsome reel?
Shall we dance the eightsome reel?
Hou aboot a fowersome at the cairts?
How about four of us playing cards?

Fractions are:

hauf
half
third or thrid
third
fowert or quarter
quarter...

continuing the same as the ordinal adjectives.

Other expressions involving numbers are:

twafauld
bentover
folded double
twa-three
a few
twal-oors
midday meal
(denner)
the tane*
the one
fower-oors
afternoon meal
(tea)
 
 
* the tae before nouns.

He wis twafauld frae eild.
He was bent double with age.
Twa-three pals is comin roond.
A few friends are coming round.
Come hame for yer twal-oors.
Come home for dinner.
It's aither the tane or the tither.
It's either one or the other.
Dinna forget an be hame by fower-oors.
Don't forget to be home for tea.

Telling the time.

Time is divided into.

seicont(s)
second(s)
meenit(s)
minute(s)
oor(s)
hour(s)

Directly after cardinal numbers, nouns of measure, usually remain unchanged in the plural.

He coud rin a hunder yaird in fowerteen seicont.
He was able to run a hundred yards in fourteen seconds.
It teuk him eleiven meenit for tae rin twa mile.
It took him eleven minutes to run two miles.
A'v been waitin on her twa oor the nou.
I've now been waiting for her for two hours.
Dinna fash. We'll win tae in guid oor.
Don't worry. We'll get there in good time.
A s' bide a wee meenit langer.
I'll stay a little longer.
The kirk bell jowes oorly.
The church bell rings hourly.
She shoud be here at the meenit.
She sould be here right now.
A telt ye tae be here on the meenit heid.
I told you to be here on the dot.
Ye'v been haiverin for oors an oors.
You've been waffling on for hours and hours.

It used to be standard practice in Scots to reckon the half-hour before the next hour, but this has largely been replaced by the Standard English practice of reckoning the half-hour after the hour. No doubt through media and educational pressure. A full hour is called a stricken-oor or strucken-oor.

Whit's the time?
What time is it?

Possible answers are:

Twa oors.
Two o'clock.
Sax oors.
Six o'clock.
Ane oors.
One o'clock.
Hauf-aicht.
Half-past seven.
Hauf-ane.
Half-past twelve.
Three on the knock.
Three o'clock.
Risin twal.
Approaching twelve.
Twa meenit afore twal.
Two minutes to twelve.
Twinty til fower.
Twenty to four.
A quarter til three.
Quarter to three.
'Gin ten oors.
Before ten o'clock.
The back o five.
Shortly after five.
Ten efter seiven.
Ten past seven.
Twinty frae sax.
Twenty to six.

Other expressions connected with times of the day are:

daw(in)
dawn
midnicht
midnight
dayligaun
dusk
mirkenin
dusk
even(in)
evening
mornin
morning
efternuin
afternoon
nuin
noon
forenicht
evening
screich o day
crack of dawn
forenuin
morning
sindoun
sunset
gloamin
just after sunset
twal-oors
midday
keek o day
crack of dawn
wee-oors
early morning

Dayligaun is a reduced form of daylicht gaun. Even(in) may be contracted to e'en(in).

The paitricks wis screichin lood at e'en.
The partridges were screeching loudly in the evening.
The muin gied us licht thon mirk Seturday e'en.
The moon gave us light that dark Saturday evening.
The mornin an forenuin wis awa cantie like.
The (early and late) morning passed pleasantly.
The morn we're gaun tae hae a forenicht thegither.
Tomorrow we are going to have a soirée together.
The freenge o the lift's reid in the late gloamin.
The fringe of the sky is red in the late twilight.
A wis up oot ma bed for tae wirk at the keek o day.
I was up and out of my bed in order to work at the crack of dawn.
A hae a tryst at the keek o nuin.
I have an appointment at mid-day.
A wis set on wi a dug this efternuin.
I was set upon by a dog this afternoon.

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